ABR Techniques as Meso Anatomical Movement Inductions

What does the ABR Team refer to,  when they speak about the “Meso-Anatomical Techniques” which we teach in the ABR Program?

“Meso – Anatomical” is the term given by Leonid Blyum to precisely describe what all ABR families do when working with the large variety of ABR manual techniques shown at each course.

“Meso “ is a term that many of our ABR parents should already be familiar with.  Meso comes from the Ancient Greek language and means: “in between – related to the middle – intermediate”.  In many lectures with ABR parents we spoke about the Embryological Mesoderm or Mesen-chyme as being the origin of connective tissues in the early embryological stages.  In this respect the “meso”-derm refers to the tissues that are developed between the two polarities of the ento (inner) and exo (outer)- derm’s.  The entoderm later develops into the tissues that become our metabolic system – whilst the exoderm develops further into what becomes our skin and nervous system.  These two systems are so far away from each other in their basic and fundamental dynamic, that they require a “middle way” – a “meso” in order to bind and connect them to one organism.  Dr. Jaap van der Wal – a world leading Embryologists says:  “The meso is not a derm! – It is a “meso”! – meaning that the meso is not a “skin” or a tissue – but it is that system which is able to live between the two extremes and at the same time creates a basis for all the various life functions – and for the inwardness of perception (proprioception, interoception)  and being as well.

By adding the prefix of “meso” to the word “anatomical” another meaning for “ in between – in the middle – intermediate”  is brought to light.  This term describes the specific qualities of ABR Techniques.  In this context “meso” designates  a quality of anatomy and movement that is not “micro” and not “macro” – meaning not on the cellular level (microscopic) and on the other hand not on the level of macro- anatomical either as would be in the case of an entire organ or a specific muscle, or muscle chains.

14358646_10154650115096454_533996977415807292_nWith ABR techniques we create movements within the child or adult that are within a very small range – the range of about one centimetre.  This range is much higher than the microscopic level, and on the other hand – if one thinks about long chain movements like taking a step or throwing a ball – these ABR movements at first seem minimal.

But these movements only “seem” minimal as long as one has not yet understood the magnitude of the importance of these movements.

 What is so special about the “meso” range that we utilize, explore and promote with the manual techniques being taught in ABR and being used in the variety of PAVES exercises shown?  The answer to this is manifold, but we can start by identifying two or three main elements:

  1. When we implement these movements by utilizing our various ABR tools such as balls and mats then we are able to help the child or otherwise affected adult to begin to implement movements that he or she cannot initiate himself. These movements are for example the movements belonging to the deep myo-fascia of the trunk and spine.  Buried within the structures of our vertebral column the nerve endings are located that are the primary communication links about any changes in our body –whether changes in posture or any positional changes requiring counter balancing reactions, stability, etc.
  2. By using meso – anatomical techniques, one is able to “induce” movements that are a part of the primary dynamic repertoire which one normally learns in the first half a year of life. At this time an infant develops this primary dynamic repertoire.  This is a repertoire of movement that can no longer be learned consciously at a later time of life.  After about six months of age the door for learning these movements closes.  At this time the length and the weight of the arms and the legs changes sufficiently in proportion to the size and weight of the trunk.  This change in proportion makes it even more difficult for a person to “learn” to execute these movements later in life.  One cannot “teach” the primary dynamic repertoire!
  3. Through “induction” of these movements to the child or adult, one can “re-train” the system to be able to carry out and to integrate these movements into the movement repertoire. Through having access to these movements, then the child is able to “balance”, to “stabilize” to control the movements.  The door to movement development is opened for the child.
  4. Here a robot example of what happens if the primary dynamics of the deep spine structures are not working can be seen here:

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=1001882553253264

At the same time this short video clips gives illustration to the spinal mobility condition of many ABR clients pre -program.  Whenever the child needs to adjust with the spine, the spine does not move.  The result for our children is that they “cannot sit”, “cannot stand” and cannot maintain weight-bearing positions.

ABR Meso-Anatomical Techniques are an unbeatable tool for getting to these deep Primary Dynamics and improving the mobility and repertoire of usage.

 

Diane Vincentz

ABR Denmark

Director

 

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